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Thursday, December 17, 2009

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Alberto

Española (11/17/09) Nayarit Cartel Traffickers Netted in Raid
(http://riograndesun.com/articles/2009/12/04/briefs/doc4b195b14c4e61421826751.txt)

see also interactive maps and links at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32049643/ns/world_news-americas/

Dr Benway

See UNESCO report: "Drug Trafficking in Mexico: A First General Assessment" by Luís Astorga at http://www.unesco.org/most/astorga.htm - among other things some very interesting historical perspectives.

Inky Ink, Inc.

And how about this installment in the saga, from the NYTimes, about border agents who were, in essence, moles for the Mexican drug cartels. These guys are working all the angles:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/18/us/18corrupt.html?hp

Gene Gadera

More than 60 percent of the cartels' revenue comes from U.S. marijuana sales ($8.6 billion out of $13.8 billion in 2006) according to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. In order to stay competitive with an steadily increasing number of American growers (who reportedly are now producing half the marijuana consumed in the US) Mexican cartels are cultivating marijuana in the US according to the National Drug Intelligence Center and local authorities. This gives them direct access to U.S. markets, avoids the risk of border seizure and significantly reduces transportation costs.

Gene Gadera

Cartels Face an Economic Battle:
U.S. Marijuana Growers Cutting Into Profits of Mexican Traffickers. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/10/06/AR2009100603847.html

coco

Do we believe the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy?

Orlando Martinez

THE HEROIN ROAD. LA Times 2/14-16/2010
Part One: Pushing heroin into the heartland.
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v10/n111/a09.html
Part Two: Black tar packs a deadly punch. http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v10/n114/a01.html
Part Three: Drug money transforms a backwater. http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v10/n117/a03.html

(part 3) “In 2000, Esteban Avila's fairy tale ended. He was among nearly 200 people arrested in a dozen cities in a federal investigation dubbed Operation Tar Pit. The case began in Chimayo after a rash of overdoses - 85 deaths in three years, representing 2% of the town's population.”

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